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Posted March 18, 2010 by lowercasecollective
Categories: Uncategorized

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Solidarity Callout

Posted March 18, 2010 by lowercasecollective
Categories: Uncategorized

Update:  To view the callout in French check it out here. Thanks to our comrades at eskarbille for the translation.

A few weeks ago we posted a call-out asking for support in lieu of our pending eviction. After receiving many questions concerning logistics and the space itself, we have decided to issue the lowercase call-out part II to clear up any confusion.

As many of you now know, the state is planning to evict the lowercase collective squat in approximately three weeks. The foreclosure and eviction of our home is one of many in this neighborhood and many other neighborhoods. Our resistance is a response to not only the attack on our home, but also to the attack on all people facing eviction as well as the system from which evictions are born.

During the weeks that precede our eviction, we are asking for the help of our friends and the greater radical community. Mutual aid, folks! These are the things we need right now:

-wood + nails
-bricks
-paints
-headlamps
-extension cords
-electricians
-batteries
-sheets (fabric)
-canned food
-storage bins
-ladders
-ornaments (bulb kind)
-muralists & artists
-self-defense classes
-ropes
-netting
-pulleys
-generators
-large amounts of water
-welders
-medic training
-lightbulbs
-mothballs
-trash bags
-medical supplies & straight-edge (alcohol-free) tinctures
-lawyer contacts
-candles & rewindable flash lights
-propane tanks
-propane stoves
-indoor plants, dirt & seeds
-money
-several 10 gallon buckets
-dental floss

Aside from these material needs, we need a physical presence in this space. This will be crucial as the eviction date gets closer. We want to be clear: this is our home and we have policies in place that allow us to maintain our collective as a safe space. They are as follows:

Oppressive behavior: Any language or action perceived to be racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, or otherwise oppressive will not be tolerated.

Consent: Our consent policy states that if you have ever been accused of assault, you are not welcome to stay here. Other than that, anything other than an explicit “yes” means no. “I’m not sure” means no. Silence means no. This applies not only to sex, but also touching, entering someone’s room, etc.

Drugs: Don’t bring them into the space. We don’t want to give the cops a reason to come in.

Vouching: someone who lives at lowercase or someone who is a close friend of ours must be able to vouch for you if you intend to stay here. This is not to exclude folks that want to help out, but we need to know we can trust the people we allow into our house.

Our house is comprised of mostly people of color, and if that makes you uncomfortable you can fuck off.

Alright then! So now you want to stop by- what next? Give us a call, email us, send us a message on facebook/myspace/twitter, whatever. But contact us first! We are sitting by our computers and our phones waiting to hear from you.

Contact us at:
lowercasecollective (at) riseup.net
friends of the lowercase collective facebook group

the landline

phone or any collective members’ cell phone

<A3 The Lowercase Collective

We are facing eviction!

Posted March 18, 2010 by lowercasecollective
Categories: Uncategorized

The Lowercase Collective has existed for over three years now. It has been a public squat for two years, and opened its doors to countless people, projects, and events. One would be hard pressed to find an anarchist who has travelled through Chicago without ever spending time in this space. When a place becomes so integral to the collective ethos of a community, as Lowercase has in Chicago, its destruction can be simply debilitating.

On December 18th, we received an eviction notice for our landlord, who is in all likelihood a fictitious entity. Shortly thereafter, we proved to the state that we ourselves have been responsible for paying the bills for the past years, making repairs, etc. Unfortunately, our attempts were only able to buy us a few more weeks, as the eviction notice for all occupants
came like a cold wind. Despite the machinations of the Federal National Mortgage Association, or any other partial owners, we have no intention of leaving this space without a fight.

Social tension has been percolating throughout our neighborhood for some time now. There is a general hatred of the police, all the more so with the existence of gangs on our street. Within a two-block radius, three other families have already been evicted in the past few months. A month ago, a black man just riding his bicycle was knocked off it by the police, beat up, and left without his bike in front of the watching eyes of the neighborhood. With all of this occurring in the context of our neighbors reproducing capital and themselves on the daily, this situation could prove explosive, as we look to push those tensions to the breaking point.

As the legal situation surrounding the house crystallizes, we will be announcing the time in which we want to invite our friends, in Chicago, the Midwest, and elsewhere, to join us for the most crucial aspect of solidarity: collective action on the day of eviction. We hope to create something truly wild around the very place we eat, sleep, fuck, dream, and share ourselves with each other. We hope for solidarity actions from friends who can’t make it here, but are more hopeful to see your faces.

Defending space in which we live, share, and combat capital is integral to revolutionary movements. Our past has connected us to so many different trajectories, and in the near future, perhaps together through our actions we can give ourselves the time and space to create so many more.